Reed cob specimens

Shown are the cut surfaces of the test specimens

Loam 80 liters / reed 80 liters

Loam 80 liters / reed 100 liters

Loam 80 liters / reed 120 liters

Loam 80 liters / reed 120 liters

Test specimens for acoustic testing

Reeds stand perpendicular to the surface

Specimen 1

Specimen 2

Specimen 3

[Test specimen unlabeled]

Test wall in Nebelin of the feasibility study Loam Noise Protection

State on August 5, 2023 three years after completion (June 5, 2020), detailed views

The front side of the test wall in the situation in Nebelin

The rammed loam part of the test wall, north side

On the left cob, on the right rammed loam, north side

Detail of the joint between cob (left) and rammed earth (right) on the north side of the wall

Cob surface, milled (cob element pressed into formwork, milled after shoring) — south side

Cob surface untreated (as from boarding) — north side

At the bottom cob surface milled straight, untreated at the top (from boarding) — front side east

Below: cob surface untreated (boarding), above: traditionally layered and tapped — front side east

Cob part of the test wall, north side; on the right is the weather side (west)

Rammed loam, north side, detail

Rammed loam, north side, detail

Rammed loam, northwest edge, detail – here most exposed to weathering

Test of different elements to provide breeding place for insects

Reeds under the wall cover. Some tube openings are closed and have thus probably been accepted by solitary bees for breeding.

Cutout for more detail

Breeding holes in a “bee loam” (so-called by the development team) element on the south side of the wall (left; cob on the right). “Bee loam” is unreinforced by fibres and just slightly manually compacted natural clay, which is intended to provide surface for breeding cells of self-digging insects.

“Bee loam” element in the cob part of the sample wall, north side. On the north side of the wall, there are no brood holes in the “bee loam”; furthermore, it can be seen that the bee loam element has open joints to the cob.

Rammed earth part of the test wall with “bee stones” and a “bee loam” element (to be seen in the middle) — south side

Detail of unreinforced and only weakly compacted “bee loam” between two rows of “bee stones” for non-self-digging solitary bees and at the same time for erosion control. Insects have dug nesting holes in the bee loam element — south side of the wall.

Great banded furrow-bee, (Halictus scabiosae) on a thistle flower directly at the site of the planned freeway service area (north of “Siedlung an der Bahn”, Nebelin)

Tansy at the site of the planned freeway service area (north of “Siedlung an der Bahn”, Nebelin)

To the right (west) of the railroad line, the A14 autobahn is being built (here at “Siedlung an der Bahn”, Nebelin)

Someone from the village has built a bench by the railroad line